0 In Aerospace Engineering/ Astronomy/ ESA

Can’t Fight the Moonlight

AS17-146-22294 (13 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed working beside a huge boulder at Station 6 (base of North Massif) during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The front portion of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is visible on the left. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander. Schmitt is the lunar module pilot. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar-orbit. NASA Identifier: HSF-photo-as17-146-22294

(13 December 1972) – Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed working beside a huge boulder during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.via NASA Goddard

ESA’s new interactive web documentary about the Moon has taken me back to the days of playing computer games as a kid. Although the documentary doesn’t have the catchy songs of LeAnn Rhymes, the early 2000s feel present with the documentary’s click and find nature of the computer games of that time. I know… I just had to work my bad music pun title into the article but in all honesty I was thinking where was this when I was 8! Dare I say it is more fun than the Magic School Bus Game?

Even though it brings up the enjoyment and memory of being a child for me, the site is definitely geared towards adults alike with countless treasure troves of information. Within each of the interactive stations on the moon there are a bunch of subset videos and infographics of more projects than you can imagine. And ESA plans to keep adding to it! In human history, the Moon has such an important role of not only human exploration but countless other scientific missions that there is plenty to talk about. The site categorizes each of the stations as Science, Technology, or Missions, so no matter what area in STEM you are interested in, there are a whole bunch of links to poke around in.

It is about time our closest neighbor is back in the spotlight.

Check out the Trailer below or go directly to the site!

 

Happy Exploring!

P.S. Don’t miss the twirling Earth in the background 😉

oh and btw if you haven’t ventured outside of the USA, ESA stands for European Space Agency, NASA’s counterpart in Europe

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